Apply For College Grants – Part 2

In Part 1 of this posting, we discussed how you can receive federal financial aid, the difference between grants and scholarships, and some common types of grants that are awarded to students.

In Part 2, we are going to continue with our last topic – common types of grants that are awarded to students. In addition to Federal Pell Grants and Federal Academic Competitiveness Grants (ACG), there are also two other common student grants: SMART and FSEOG.

  • Federal National Science and Mathematics Access to Retain Talent Grants (SMART)

These National Smart Grants are awarded to third and fourth year undergraduates students and provides up to $4,000 each year.  In order to be eligible for these grants, students must meet the following requirements:

  1. Federal Pell Grant Recipient
  2. Third or Fourth Year Undergraduate Student
  3. Full-time Student
  4. Majoring in Physical Science, Life Science, Computer Science, Mathematics, Technology, Engineering, or in a Foreign Language deemed critical to national security.
  5. Maintain a cumulative GPA of 3.0 in courses required for major
  • Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grants (FSEOG)

The FSEOG Program is a campus-based program.  These grants are provided to students who have exceptional financial need (or the lowest Expected Family Contribution (EFC)).  Student who receive Federal Pell Grants are automatically considered for this grant when they complete their FAFSA form.  Students can receive anywhere between $100 and $4,000 dollars from this grant. In order to be eligible for these grants, students must meet the following requirements:

  1. Federal Pell Grant Recipient
  2. U.S. Citizen
  3. Part-time Student (minimum)

Nearly 1 million students receive Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grants each year.  However, awards are given based on the availability of funds at each school, so there is no guarantee that every eligible student will receive an award.

The financial aid process can be very confusing for high school students, so I hope these two posts gave you a clear understanding of how to apply for college grants and what are some of the common types of college grants that you might see in your student financial aid award letter.

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TheCollegeHelper

TheCollegeHelper

Lauren Anderson is a certified school counselor who's passionate about helping students all over the world successfully transition from high school to college! After spending 6 years as a business professional, she obtained her Master’s degree in School Counseling and now spends her spare time helping students.
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