Should I Go To College Part-time?

According to CompleteCollege.org, life can get in the way of graduation for part-time students.

A bachelor’s degree takes an average of 4.7 years for full-time students. For part-time students it takes an average of 5.6 years, that is for those who graduate.

For students who are working towards their bachelor’s degree part-time, only 25.6% will graduate, and that is taking twice as long to complete your degree (8 years).

For students thinking about going to school part-time make sure you weigh out the consequences, like eligibility for financial aid, graduating later and not being able to qualify for some scholarships.

Being a part-time student does have its advantages. For people who need to work, going to school part-time is a great option. However, for students who want to take 2 classes every semester just because they like to relax, would be taking advantage of being a part-time student and possibly not graduating.

I have met students who go part-time because they have a family to take care of or they work 40 hours a week and go to school at night. Sometimes, 12 credits are too much to handle for some students, so they take 9 credits. Even though taking under 12 credits puts you in the part-time category, it is ok to do it some semesters depending on which classes you are taking.

I firmly believe that if a student is capable of going to college full-time, they should. Mainly because if you don’t have a reason, going part-time can allow for laziness and students often become tired of school knowing it is taking them twice as long to get a degree.

Whatever you decide, it is important to have a passion and drive to complete college, especially if you are going part-time. It’s not always about how you get through college, just as long as you get through.

So whether you are working your way through college or can’t handle a full class load, going part-time is only effective if you are serious about completing your degree.

Family Commitments

Many students, older and young, find themselves battling with their time commitments between family and school. Whether you are a parent or you have responsibilities to your immediate family, going to school part-time is a great alternative. Usually, family will support you in getting your degree, not only this but if you are a provider taking classes it is a great option to be able to take your time taking one or two classes on your time.

Online classes are also great options for students with families. Switching between online classes and classes on campus can help with your demanding schedule.

Limited Financial Resources

Not only are we going through a recession but the student loan debt is up to $1 trillion. Many students have to work their way through college which is a difficult task but can be done.

Representative Virginia Foxx, a Republican from North Carolina who heads a House subcommittee on higher education and work force training.

“I spent seven years getting my undergraduate degree and didn’t borrow a dime of money,”

she once said at a subcommittee meeting, adding that she was bewildered, given her own experience, by hearing from people who were in $80,000 in debt.

By going to school part-time, students can pay for what they can afford, whether it through working, loans, scholarships or help from their parents. As long as a student is dedicated, they can graduate with a four-year degree within the time they can afford.

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Rachel Talaska

Rachel Talaska

Rachel Talaska is a junior at Central Michigan University pursuing degrees in public relations, journalism and marketing. Besides being in class, Rachel can be found working at the campus newspaper, Central Michigan Life in the advertising department or watching re-runs of "Friends." She hopes to one day move to a big city and find her dream job. Rachel enjoys fashion, eating healthy (with the occasional bowl of ice cream), fitness, reading, traveling, and spending time with friends and family.
Rachel Talaska

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