Space Savers: Four Dorm Items Better Left At Home

At first, the list of items your university suggests you bring to campus is extremely nauseating. Your leisurely summer is turned on its side by the need to buy out the entire “college” section of Target. While the college websites do provide a helpful list of what not to bring, dozens of freshmen always end up bringing much more than they bargained for and never use their supplies!

Although these items may seem practical at the time, the only use they have is collecting dust in the closet. Before you bring that cumbersome object, reflect on these neglected dorm items.

  • Vacuum Cleaner

Trust me, these clunkers are not worth the closet space they occupy. Often, your average dorm closet has very minimal storage space, and shoving a vacuum in there is completely unnecessary. While a small handheld one is a possibility, steer clear of the mini-vacuums that require a good deal of heavy lifting. Although you will have to sweep the floor occasionally, the need arises so scarcely in your tiny living quarters that it is almost useless. Plus, most residence halls allow you to rent out a vacuum from the front desk for free. In other words, save your money and closet space: do not bring a vacuum.

  • Printer / Scanner / Copier

Despite the number of papers you will probably print off in the upcoming years at the university, owning a printer is not only irrelevant but also an unneeded addition to the already huge load from move-in day. In my own dorm room, I have to keep my printer in the closet because there is not enough space for it on my desk. My building also has its own computer lab complete with printers, scanners and copiers. I could have easily saved on closet space if I had just left the printer at home since my dorm already makes up for not having one. Even if your future home does not have its own computer lab, there are bound to be numerous places on campus to print papers. Save yourself the cost of the printer, paper and ink. Leave it at home.

  • Books for Leisure Reading

Believe it or not, your dorm room will probably not have the shelf space for the entire Harry Potter or A Song of Fire and Ice series. With the already cluttered space from required textbooks for class, you would be wise to leave your entire library at home. A room stuffed to bursting with books can also look messy and disorganized. To remedy the loss of your treasured works of literature, make to bring along an e-reader for the semester. If you do not own an e-reader, checking out books from the library is free and also a learning experience all its own. When the time comes to research for a big term paper, you will already be a connoisseur of the stacks at the undergraduate library. Also, college libraries offer such a vast range of books that you will hardly miss your own.

  • Television

I can hear you all audibly gasping already. “But Tori, what will I do without my episodes of Toddlers & Tiaras on Wednesday nights?!” You will survive. Believe me. My freshman year, all my tv did was wobble atop what I liked to call “the tower of electronics.” It was unsafe and not even worth the totem pole it was mounted on. Most of the times, I would miss my shows without realizing it and simply watch them online the next day. In my residence hall, there are even groups of people who meet in the main lounge specifically to watch television shows. The talking box is not in short supply at college, so if you don’t have one, fret not. Someone else is bound to have one. With services like Netflix and Hulu, along with broadcast news putting most of their content on the Internet, televisions are gradually becoming a way of the past.

 

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Tori Stukins

Tori Stukins

Tori Stukins is a sophomore at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign pursuing a degree in Broadcast Journalism with a minor in Theatre. On campus, Tori can often be found working on various projects for Her Campus Illinois, acting in a production or reading. While at home, she enjoys working at her family’s restaurant or exploring with her friends.